Online Education

The Life Skills Gap

I have always been concerned about what and how we help learners. Do we teach them “by the book,” using specific outlines that are given, or do we consider real life situations when providing educational training. I’ve always thought there was a gap. A young niece of mine and I had a conversation one day about “life” as a college student. She was crammed with the traditional courses, but was badly in need of fundamentals of life having to do with budgeting, access to all those credit-card offers, the realities of living with others and sharing rent (oh yes, you better understand when YOU sign the lease, YOU are on the hook for the rent… etc. She wasn’t getting that in school.

Those conversations always get me to thinking we teach what we are required to teach, but do we make sure to include those “other, not required, but really essential” topics? I hope so! My goal as an educator is to help develop people with a depth of real estate knowledge that guides through the potholes and steers them reach their goals. There are lots of potholes in real estate, so there are many topics to cover. My goal is to fill that Life Skills Gap.

This article was originally published by the Association of American Educators on January 30, 2018 Melissa Pratt is the Professional Programs Manager for the Association of American Educators. In this role, she helps connect AAE members with resources and information to further their craft.

There’s been a lot of debate recently on what students need to know to be “college and career ready.” Typically, the debate centers on how high the standards for math and reading should be, how much social studies and science high school grads should participate in, and whether career and technical education should be given renewed emphasis. What seldom gets mentioned are the many small tasks that are essential to everyday life, but never make it into the curriculum.

We know that skills like filing taxes, saving money, applying for jobs, time management skills, and the like can make or break an individual in their first few years of adulthood, but we seldom give thought to how we should approach these skills. Often, schools assume that students are either being taught these skills at home by their parents or gain them through life experience, but that is not always the case. Both research and anecdotal evidence points to our students having trouble with everyday tasks after they graduate from high school.

Despite this, many are unconvinced that schools should be stepping in to help fill this gap. They point to an already crowded curriculum and wonder what we’d be willing to give up to make room for life skill courses. Others worry that a life skill course would be self-defeating. By taking these skills and removing them from the circumstances where they’d be used and needed, we’d be robbing them of their authenticity and relevance, which we know is essential for students to internalize what they’ve learned.

On the opposite side, proponents of teaching life skills argue that no matter how academically successful a student is, they are set up for failure if they can’t master certain essential skills. This fact is urgent for students who may not have a support structure at home to help them muddle through their first years of adulthood. Some students will be taught these skills at home and gain them through life experience, but not all will.

Educators who have placed a high value on teaching life skills have gone a long way to integrate them into the curriculum. Many schools use their extra-curriculars to teach students these skills and allow students to run and manage newspapers, stores, performance scheduling, and other tasks sometimes conducted by staff. A few schools take things further. Slater High School recently debuted their “Life Academy.” This program, which is designed to teach students skills like research, family planning, legal rights, budgeting, etc., will be conducted on days where there is an early dismissal and a normal class schedule is otherwise impossible.

The inclusion of life skills does not have to lead to a full-fledged rewriting of the curriculum or school structure. Individual teachers can help students acquire life skills by raising awareness of them in the classroom through discussion and the incorporation of certain skills into already planned projects and lessons.

E-NOTARIZATION VS. DISTANCE E-NOTARIZATION

Did you know

E-Notarization has been here for some time
Effective July 1, 2006, the Minnesota Legislature enacted electronic notary legislation pursuant to Minnesota Statutes 358 and 359, allowing electronic notarization to be applied to a document so that the document can be fully processed electronically.
To apply for e-Notarization, applicants must be currently registered as an active Minnesota Notary and have the capability to notarize electronically before requesting authorization to perform electronic notarizations.
Physical presence of a person whose signature is being notarized is still required by law (359.01, subd. 5). And notarizing of any MN mortgage and/or real estate documents requires a Closing Agent License unless you fall under specific exemptions – see MSA 82.641.
Before performing electronic notarial acts, a notary public must register or in the case of a recommission, reregister, the capability to notarize electronically with the Secretary of State. There is no fee for this authorization with the secretary of State
To obtain the authorization to perform electronic notarization, complete the E-Notarization Authorization form and certify that you have proof of the filing of your notary commission with the county.

Distance E- Notarization is Coming
Generally, electronic, or e-signatures, use different methods
• In some cases, the signer can use the mouse on their computer to “write” their signature, like you do when you go to the grocery store and sign for your credit card (where it generally looks nothing like your signature;))
• In other cases, a signer types their name and choses their e-signature from an assortment of a type-sets (Script, Monotype, Bradley Hand, etc.)
• In other cases yet, the signer carefully writes his/her signature and takes a photo (likely with their cell phone) and creates a .jpg file that they can use to accurately represent their signature.
• In some cases, signers hold up their Drivers’ Licenses and other Identifying information for the notary to review
• in other cases, like the US Post Office, you must put in a credit card with identifying information
• Yet again, some systems require that you answer information as to the make of your vehicle, previous addresses, mother’s maiden name, etc. that likely come from credit reporting companies.
• Will the audio/visual session have to be taped and maintained in the notaries file to be legal?
• Can the notary keep a log instead? There is much to be worked out.
You can see examples of what’s coming in distance notarization at such places as
• Signix https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=50bMl3EZkz0
• Safedocs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPd_0gtlJ_0
• DocVerify http://www.docverify.com/Products/ESignatures/ENotaries/RemoteElectronicNotarizations

Distance notarization laws are currently in effect in only two states -Virginia and Montana. In these states the signer and the notary communicate online. Documents are electronically signed and notarized with the signing parties and notary meeting with audio and video communications similar to “facetime” or “go-to-meeting.” Here, the signer of the document might physically be in New York City and the notary physically in Virginia, MN.

But these state laws vary significantly. In Virginia a notary can perform a remote apostille for a signer that is located anywhere in the world. Montana allows distance notarization only for Montana property where the affiant is a permanent Montana resident.

As industries like closing, title insuring, mortgage lending, etc. are nationwide, dealing with various laws could be challenging. In response to that, The National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS) are working on distance online notarization with a task force, as are ALTA, the Minnesota Land Title Association, the MN Bar Assoc., Mortgage Bankers Association, MISMO, and others. Hopefully they can come together, soon, with a clear solution that will fit us all.

It has been a long time since I have seen information from Commerce on the Licensing requirements for Abstracters, and I was pleased to see their latest bulletin.  While I know there is no education requirement, the content is significant and requires a good working knowledge of the trade. For those who need assistance with the legalese in title searching the online Principles of Abstracting course can help.  In any case, here is the outline from the PSI bulletin.

ABSTRACTER EXAMINATION CANDIDATE INFORMATION BULLETIN

Legal description and elements of real property (10 items)

  1. Definitions and components of real property
  2. Methods of legal description
  3. Estates in real property
  4. Forms of ownership
  5. Transfer / alienation of real property
  6. Deeds
  7. Types
  8. Characteristics / elements

iii. Warranties

  1. Land use controls
  2. Public
  3. Private/Covenants, conditions, and restrictions (CC&Rs)
  1. Condominium Law

Documents (15 items)

  1. Conveyance
  2. Recording
  3. Torrens
  4. Encumbrances
  5. Types and priorities of liens
  6. Easements
  7. Encroachments

Research and Compilation of Abstract (20 items)

  1. Indexes
  2. Search requirements and techniques
  3. Documents and Entries
  4. Legal description in abstract
  5. Searches (including judgments in favor of the U.S.)
  6. Certification

Licensing and Professional Conduct (5 items)

  1. Licensing requirements
  2. Prohibited conduct

 

MN Closer Licensing Course

I’ve had many questions on the MN Closer Pre-License Course, so here are some pointers:

Pointers

Pointers

  • the 8 hour class is available online 24/7 and you have 90 days to complete it.
  • You do not need to take all 8 hours in one sitting!  Just bookmark your place and return to it later.
  • there is a minimum amount of time that must be spent on each of the 12 sections, but there is no maximum time, so spend as long as you’d like to be sure you understand the material
  • if you don’t complete a section before the minimum required time and you log out , you will have to repeat that section
  • Each section has a quiz at the end. You must pass the quiz to move on
  • the final examination requires a proctor form (someone who says they saw you take the exam without assistance of any kind.)  The proctor cannot be a spouse, relative or boss.  A neighbor, friend or public librarian (there is no charge) works fine
  • the final exam is 90 questions and you need 75% to pass.  You may spend as long as you like on the exam (but you cannot leave your desk during the exam, so the proctor knows you have not used outside materials for any answers.)
  • If you fail the exam, not to worry. You can review the material (if you wish) but must retake the quizzes to retake the exam (no extra charge.)

Mobile Notaries Require Closing Agent License

The Minnesota Department of Commerce Enforcement Division is reminding mobile notaries who explain mortgage documents, notarize deeds, collect funds and handle other tasks incidental to closing, that they are required by Minnesota Law to obtain a Closing Agent License.  The closer licenses are licenses that expire June 30th  two years after they are issued.   The online course listed above, “Principles of Closing,” satisfies the state requirement for the license.

Mobile Notaries – Do You Have the Required Minnesota Closer License

Minnesota is sending out Enforcement Notices to Mobile Notaries reminding them that under Minnesota Law, those who notarize deeds, mortgages, affidavits and other documents to assist a party in buying or selling real estate in Minnesota are required to have a Closer’s Licence from the Minnesota Department of Commerce.

The primary Closer License Laws are MN Statute 507.45 and MN Statute 82.641

The Commerce Department is authorized to penalize those who are not compliant, so please be sure to obtain the proper license. More information about Closer Licensing can be found here on the Commerce Department Website.

Title Companies should also assure that any closing agents they use are duly licensed under the law.

Independent Abstractors: Dying Breed or Valued Specialists?

 A post from Thomas Pryde’s Blog, re-printed with his permission.

The prevailing view among some industry leaders seems to be that the independent abstractor is a dying breed, the last vestige of an ancient way of doing business. This is attributed to the rapidly expanding digitization of title documents and new technology solutions that are being designed to quickly and efficiently obtain and deliver those documents to their clients. This is one example where technology has made promises well beyond what it can actually provide.

Thomas Pryde’s Blog ::

While it is true that the need for independent title abstractors might actually be eliminated if the idealized descriptions of a technology provider’s capabilities proved realistic, proclamations of the imminent demise of their business may be premature. In fact, the independent abstractor has a real opportunity that seems to have been largely overlooked, but in order to understand and take advantage of this opportunity, we have to first examine the promised market of full digitization and automation.

In this oft-prophesied and idealized market, all archived public documents will be available both remotely and digitally, and the client who needs these documents would be able to simply and efficiently obtain them, removing the need for someone to go to the courthouse, manually obtain documents, scan them, and then deliver them back to the client.

All search-related activities could be performed remotely, and there would be no need for any local expertise. This is the essence of what is promised on the back of technology.

However, if digital availability was ubiquitous, if the digitized documents were perfect, and if all the related data was flawless, such technology might indeed eliminate the need for a skilled abstractor. However, achieving such perfection in the document chain would also virtually eliminate the need for the title insurance industry as a whole.

Of course, the reality is (and will continue to be) far from this ideal, and title insurance companies will continue to thrive on the potential existence of problems that might be found in any given document chain. As long as this is true, local expertise and timely results can work together to offer a value proposition that will ultimately trump a mindless search service offered at rock bottom prices.

 

Legal Description Online Course Sale

biting nails confused childNot quite sure about that legal description?

This online course will show you how to read and draw legal descriptions. Even the “geographically impaired” will learn how to identify the correct parcel on a map, and draw out descriptions to look for possible gaps and overlaps.

An easy and fun course that simplifies and explicates descriptions.

Spring Promotion, Type: MetesandBounds into the Coupon code before March 31st for a $50 savings.

Testimonial for “Principles of Abstracting”Online Course

HI Jeanne,

I  have to pass on this news to you, as you are a HUGE part of my success.

I found out last week that I passed my exam and am Licensed in SD now!!!

I raved of your courses to the Board of Abstracters.  I know I wouldn’t have been successful in this quest so quickly without your help!

(even scored 100% in one of the 5 sections!!)

Thank you!  Thank you!!

For whatever reason this industry is difficult to find training on.  I wish it were required to have the standard of training you provide for all individuals to be licensed in any state!

Traci Renkly

Office Manager/Closing Agent

Brookings County Title Company

422 4th Street

Brookings, SD 57006

Do We Recognize Those Daily Unfair Deceptive Practices

We see them so often, I think we have started to simply overlook those daily Unfair and Deceptive Practices. You  simply can’t go anywhere without someone trying to push a new credit card (when you complain they tell you,  “sorry, my company requires that we ask all customers to open one of OUR credit cards.”) It’s all very annoying.

But worse, my young nephew, a college student, working part time at Walmart, went into a we’ll-go-far bank to cash his hard earned money.  He is attacked by the well-trained teller, who advises him he really should have some help with his finances now that he is a man, earning his own money and the bank can help. “Well, of course, he says proudly, who should I talk to?”  The next thing we know, he comes home with no cash, a new checking account, a new savings account, and a credit card in his proud name with $35 late fees and a 29% interest rate!  He’s no dummy, but we all know students who got suckered by predatory banks into a bad credit card. The CFPB takes that VERY seriously.

So I really appreciate the CFPB and many of the finance challenges they are tackling.  Some of the Unfair practices include

  • Add-On” products, such as enrolling customers for “free” (for one month with a monthly billing after that for Identity Theft Protection, debt protection or credit score services. Often through a third party vendor.
  • Mortgage Servicing
    • where lenders do not honor loan modifications after a servicing transfer,
    • requiring borrowers to “waive all existing claims” in order to qualify for a loan modification
    • failing to properly apply mortgage payments and hosts of others
  • Student loans and Credit Cards, knowing that many students were vulnerable in need for money and unable to understand the consequences of late payment and compound interest. Yes, I agree. We need to teach students more about financing!

An outstanding set of articles by Morrison Foerster gives a much deeper look into UDAAP and the CFPB.  They describe items of interest that annoy many of us (at least this author) by constantly trying to sell us items that are semi-related to what we are in the process of doing.  Their second article is even more detailed.         Both are very interesting – as a consumer, an educator for the mortgage and title industries, and an advocate for fair pratices.

 

 

Info On Home Closing

Home Closing 101: An Educational Initiative of the American Land Title Association