According to Builder Online, HUD has delayed the implementation of RESPA that was to go into effect on Jan. 16th by 90 days. HUD agreed to the delay to assemble info it needs to defend against another lawsuit , this one brought  on by he National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and other plaintiffs, including 13 large builders and their affiliated lenders and title companies.

HUD’s published final rule eliminates builders from offering home buyers incentives if the buyers are linked into using an affiliated title company, mortgage company, or other affiliated service provider. The NAHB suggests that dismantling these affiliations will not help the consumer and will additionally lead to job losses.  

HUD is also dealing with a lawsuit filed by the Mortgage Brokers Association (MBA) in December that is trying to block a rule requiring lenders and mortgage brokers to provide buyers with a “good faith estimate” that discloses loan terms and yield-spread premiums on the HUD-1 settlement statement.

Surprisingly, at this time, there seems to be no interest by the American Land Title Association (ALTA) to commence a lawsuit against the very unpopular required disclosure on the HUD-1 of the premium split between title agencies (that receive the vast majority of the premium) and title underwriters (who receive very little.) HUD has required the disclosure based on recommendations from the Government Accountability Office that has been critical of the industry practice.